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At the beginning of Vesterbro and the edge of Frederiksberg, you will find one of Copenhagen’s coziest streets, Værnedamsvej. The atmosphere here is almost Parisian with a mix of Danish street culture. Between the small cafés and trendy stores, Grant Compass has their headquarters.

Their office, fully equipped with OMNI furniture, has undergone swift development — a reflection of the rapid growth Grant Compass has experienced the last couple of years. Being located on a very attractive address, Grant Compass needed an office that resonated with both the location and their own culture and ambitions.


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Scandinavian Design is a term used to coin the aesthetics of a very minimalist, but highly functional, design style. It came out of the long, dark, and harsh winters that drove people inside, demanding utility rather than decoration. It is famous for its simple and natural forms and durable craftsmanship. We think the style also became so popular, because it triggers our sense of tidiness as well as the need to spend time in comfortable and cozy settings.

When in Copenhagen, one can easily see it and definitely experience it everywhere — from the buildings, cafes, hotels, and even in the way services are designed. What is specific about Danish interior design is that it welcomes novelty and combines it with ideas of simplicity and functionalism. The Danish design scene has a rich history of innovation — not to mention, the atmosphere of warmth and comfort that comes from always having a candle lit and, of course, hygge. …


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Lunar is a digital bank, challenging the framework set out by traditional banks. Disruption is key. Both to the foundation of Lunar’s business model and in their office space. They are not tied to traditional banking culture or language. Although being a bank, they do not have branches. They have offices — in a modern sense.


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With the global COVID-19 pandemic, offices have been shut down, and employees have been working from home. While companies are starting to open up again, at least 46% of Danish employees would still like to work from home. Meanwhile, some employers have chosen to discontinue the office altogether and stay virtual, while others see the COVID-19 crisis as a great opportunity to start doing a hybrid model, with for example CODAN now letting their employees work from home 40% of the time.

However, working from home requires proper seating and a good working environment, both for employee wellbeing, but also because the law states that the same work environment requirements are applicable for working from home. Providing proper working conditions can be very costly, a logistical nightmare, and highly impractical, so it is understandable that companies, who may already be struggling to find their way out of the crisis, may not want to acquire the sudden unexpected costs associated with paying for home offices. Furthermore, employees may not even have the space required to fit such (usually bulky) office furniture in their homes, and as a result, employees often suffice with working from their dining table or the sofa, impacting their long-term health. …

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Yuan Nielsen

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